Image source does not exist News Release: 2011-03-15 City of Compton fined $48,000 for diesel truck and equipment violations

Release #:11-12
Date:03/15/2011

ARB PIO: (916) 322-2990
CONTACT:

Karen Caesar
626-575-6728

kcaesar@arb.ca.gov






City of Compton fined $48,000 for diesel truck and equipment violations


City failed to inspect, clean-up or label trash trucks, vehicles and construction equipment


SACRAMENTO - The California Air Resources Board has fined the City of Compton $48,800 for a variety of infractions pertaining to its diesel fleet vehicles, including failing to properly maintain and self-inspect its diesel trucks and register construction equipment, as required by state law.

ARB investigators cited the city for failing to test and maintain records of smoke levels from its fleet of heavy-duty diesel vehicles for 2008 and 2009. The city was also faulted for not updating its trash trucks with diesel particulate filters and affixing proper labels according to a pre-set schedule. Finally, the city failed to register and attach mandatory labels to its off-road fleet including skiploaders, frontloaders and other vehicles commonly used in construction.

"Diesel exhaust is a serious threat to community health," said ARB Enforcement Chief Jim Ryden. "Fleets of diesel equipment and vehicles must meet clean-air standards and requirements in order to legally operate in California."

Of the $48,800 owed by the city, $36,600.00 will be paid to the California Air Pollution Control Fund to support projects and research to improve California’s air quality, while $12,200.00 will go to the Peralta Community College District to fund emissions education classes conducted by participating California community colleges under the California Council for Diesel Education and Technology program.

Ryden added that the City has a checkered diesel vehicle maintenance and recordkeeping history dating back several years.

Under terms of the penalty, the City of Compton must:

Diesel exhaust contains a variety of harmful gases and over 40 other known cancer-causing compounds. In 1998, California identified diesel particulate matter as a toxic air contaminant based on its potential to cause cancer, premature death and other health problems.

ARB's mission is to promote and protect public health, welfare, and ecological resources through effective reduction of air pollutants while recognizing and considering effects on the economy. The ARB oversees all air pollution control efforts in California to attain and maintain health based air quality standards.