CALIFORNIA AIR RESOURCES BOARD

Lincoln Plaza
Auditorium, First Floor
400 "P" Street
Sacramento, CA

June 14, 1990
9:30 a.m.

AGENDA

Page No.

90-6-1 Public Hearing to Consider Amendments to 001
Regulations Regarding Exhaust Emission
Standards, Certification and Compliance Test
Procedures, and Durability Requirements
Applicable to Light-Duty Trucks and
Medium-Duty and Light Heavy-Duty Vehicles
and Engines.

90-6-2 Public Hearing to Consider the Adoption of 033
Amendments to the Emission Inventory Criteria
and Guidelines Regulation Pursuant to the Air
Toxics "Hot Spots" Information and Assessment
Act of 1987.

90-6-3 Public Meeting to Consider a Report to the 285
Legislature Regarding the Inclusion in the
Air toxics "Hot Spots" Program of Facilities
that Emit Less Than 10 Tons Per Year of Criteria
Pollutants.

Closed Session:

Litigation -- Authorized by Govt. Code Section
11126(q)(1); Exxon Corp., et al., v. California
Air Resources Board.


ITEM NO.: 90-6-1

Public Hearing to Consider Amendments to Regulations Regarding
Exhaust Emission Standards, Certification and Compliance Test
Procedures, and Durability Requirements Applicable to Light-Duty
Trucks and Medium-Duty and Light Heavy-Duty Vehicles and Engines.

RECOMMENDATION

The staff recommends that the Board adopt amendments to the
exhaust emission standards and test procedures, in-use compliance
procedures and on-board diagnostic requirements applicable to
medium-duty vehicles and light heavy-duty trucks. The staff also
recommends that the Board revise the current oxides of nitrogen
exhaust emission standard for light-duty trucks.

DISCUSSION

Medium-duty vehicles (MDVs) and light heavy-duty vehicles (LHDVs)
include average and large size pick-up trucks and vans. The
staff proposes to revise the current MDV classification, test
procedures, exhaust emission standards, and durability
requirements for these vehicles beginning in the 1995 model-year.

MDV Classification

MDVs are defined as vehicles from 6,001 to 8,500 pounds, gross
vehicle weight (GVW), and LHDVs are categorized as vehicles from
8,501 to 14,000 pounds, GVW. MDVs and LHDVs are similar in usage
patterns and load levels. Therefore, the staff proposes to
revise the MDV classification to include all vehicles from 6.001
to 14,000 pounds, GVW.

Test Procedures

Currently, LHDVs are certified to engine emission standards and
test procedures. The engine test procedures were designed to
reflect the usage patters of very large heavy-duty commercial
vehicles and are not applicable for the majority of LHDVs. MDVs
are not applicable for the majority of LHDVs. MDVs are not
applicable for the majority of LHDVs. MDVs are chassis-certified
in a manner similar to passenger cars and light-duty trucks.
These vehicles can carry loads of as much as 2000 pounds, however
the current durability and testing requirements are lightly
loaded and do not address the emission impact of these high
loads.

This proposal would require MDVs and LHDVs to be certified
according to the chassis test procedures. In addition, the
durability and testing load would be increased to 50 percent of
the vehicle's maximum load carrying capacity. Staff proposes to
allow incomplete LHDVs and diesel LHDVs from 8501-14,000 pounds
GVW the option to maintain engine certification since these
vehicles comprise the majority of commercial applications and may
be appropriately certified on the engine test cycle.
The engine test procedures make it impractical to perform in-use compliance testing because the Board does not have the facilities to conduct engine testing and current incentives are not sufficient for owners to volunteer their vehicles for testing. Therefore, the staff proposes that manufacturers of incomplete and diesel vehicles using the optional engine test procedures either reimburse the state board for the cost of in-use compliance testing or develop correlation factors that would allow the state board to determine in-use compliance with the chassis test. Manufacturers would also be required to provide replacement engines as an incentive to participating vehicle owners in order to make the in-use compliance testing more practical. Emission Standards The current MDV and LHDV exhaust emission standards are not stringent enough to necessitate the use of the most advanced emission control components. In addition, distinct diesel standards are currently available which result in greater overall emissions from diesel vehicles compared to similar gasoline vehicles. Staff proposes more stringent hydrocarbon (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission standards for MDVs. For incomplete and diesel LHDVs subject to engine certification, the proposal would require a more stringent combined HC + NOx standard in place of distinct HC and NOx standards. The proposed combined standard necessitates a significant reduction of NOx emissions, but permits manufacturers the flexibility to optimize their emission control system. One set of MDV and LHDV emission standards are proposed for both gasoline and diesel vehicles. Staff also proposes a more stringent NOx standard for light-duty trucks to be consistent with the MDV standards. Durability Requirements The current certification durability period and in-use recall period for MDVs is limited to 50,000 miles. However, the average MDV accumulates over 140,000 miles and nearly 70% of MDV exhaust emissions occur beyond 50,000 miles. Staff proposes an extension of the durability period for MDVs and LHDVs from 50,000 miles and 110,000 miles, respectively, to 120,000 miles in order to be consistent with the current federal durability period for light-duty trucks. Additional Requirements This proposal would also revise the on-board diagnostic requirements to apply to all reclassified MDVs, whether chassis or engine certified. Implementation Implementation of the proposed regulations would begin in the 1995 model year. Certification compliance would be required for 50 percent of the fleet in the 1995 model year and 100 percent of the fleet in the 1996 and subsequent model years. In-use compliance requirements would be 25 percent less stringent for the first two years of certification to the new standards. SUMMARY OF IMPACTS OF PROPOSED ACTION The staff estimates that the proposed regulations will result in a statewide emission reduction of 4.4 tons/day HC, 126 tons/day of CO, and 43 tons/day of NOx in the year 2010. The proposed regulations will result in an estimated average increase of $115 per vehicle, with a cost effectiveness of $2.17 per pound of HC reduced, $0.10 per pound of CO reduced, $0.51 per pound of NOx reduced, and $0.41 per pound of HC + NOx reduced. ITEM NO.: 90-6-2 Public Hearing to Consider the Adoption of Amendments to the Emission Inventory Criteria and Guidelines Regulation Developed Pursuant to Requirements of the Air Toxics "Hot Spots" Information and Assessment Act of 1987. RECOMMENDATION The staff recommends that the Board adopt the proposed amendments to the emission inventory criteria and guidelines regulation. DISCUSSION The existing criteria and guidelines regulation was approved by the Board in April 1989, as required by the Air Toxics "Hot Spots" Act. The existing criteria and guidelines regulation does the following: 1) specifies the information a facility operator must include a facility's air toxics emission inventory plan and report; 2) includes requirements for source testing, specifications for acceptable emission estimation methods, the reporting forms to be used, and other specifications; and 3) establishes two groups of substances to be inventoried, one for which emissions must be quantified and a second for which only information on production, use, or other presence must be reported. The proposed amendments to the existing criteria and guidelines regulation implement two other requirements of the Act. The Act requires the ARB to develop procedures for the biennial update of the emission inventories. Proposed procedures are included. The Act also requires the ARB to prepare a report to the Legislature by July 1, 1990, identifying classes of facilities that emit less than 10 tons per year of criteria pollutants to be included in the Air Toxics "Hot Spots" program and specifying a timetable for their inclusion. These classes of facilities are identified in a new appendix to the proposed amended regulation. The reporting requirements and a timetable for these facilities are incorporated in the amendments. Other improvements and clarifications are proposed to the existing regulation, including additional source test requirements where new methods are available and additional testing is appropriate. ITEM NO.: 90-6-3 Public Meeting to Consider a Report to the Legislature Regarding the Inclusion in the Air Toxics "Hot Spots" Program of Facilities that Emit Less Than 10 Tons Per Year of Criteria Pollutants. RECOMMENDATION The staff recommends that the Board approve the proposed Report to the Legislature. DISCUSSION The Air Toxics "Hot Spots" Information and Assessment Act of 1987 required that the ARB prepare a report to the legislature by July 1, 1990, identifying the classes of facilities that emit less than 10 tons per year (tpy) of each of the criteria pollutants (referred to as the "less-than-10-tpy facilities") to be included in the "Hot Spots" program and specifying a timetable for the inclusion (Health and Safety Code Section 44322(c)). The proposed report entitled, "Inclusion in the Air Toxics "Hot Spots" Program of Facilities that Emit Less Tha